December 30th, 2010
Hey there! Hope the holidays treated everyone amicably, and everyone still has enough juice left to make to the new year. I've been at home enjoying the snow and trying to get prepped for the X Games next month (more on that soon). In the meantime, Pixiq, a really cool photo site has posted an interview about my photo project, The Rolling Exhibition. The difference between this and the others is that they actually let me geek out and explain how the series was technically pulled off.
Most of the images were captured at ISO 320. “If I was shooting in an open area and there wasn’t too much contrast in light, I would usually trust the program mode. If I was shooting between buildings, at night, or in any situation with contrasty light—I’d go manual, though I’d never go wider than f/8, if I could avoid it,” Kevin explains.
If the above paragraph makes sense, you might dig the full article - which can be found right here.
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December 8th, 2010
Anyone in Bozeman this Friday?  Well, if you're in town and feeling bored on Friday evening, come down to Barrel Mountaineering for a photo show of some of my collected, non-Rolling Exhibition works. All prints will be for sale, and 10% of proceeds will go to Eagle Mount of Helena. We'll be serving wine and light appetizers from 6pm - 8pm . If you're keen to buy a print, get a book signed, or just drink some wine - come on over!
Details: Barrel Mountaineering Art Gallery 240 E Main - 582-1335 Friday, Dec 10th 6-8pm
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December 6th, 2010
Howdy everyone - As promised, here are the questions I wanted to ask of your class, but ran out of time. If you would like to answer these, great. But as I stated in class, the last thing I want to do shovel homework on you during finals week. I'll leave it up to your teachers to decide if this should be mandatory or not. It was great meeting everyone, though, and hopefully I'll we'll see each other again sometime!
1.) How would your country respond socially to someone with a physical disability? Is there stigma associated? 2.) Is there a common assumption, or story, that is commonly associated with physical disability in your country? (i.e. "was it a shark attack?" "do you still wear your dog tags from Iraq?") If so, what is it? 3.) Are adaptive sports and technology (i.e. monoskiing, wheelchair rugby, etc) well known in your country? 4.) How do you think “the Dirtbags” in chapter 6 helped to shape Kevin’s view of disability? Can you think of anyone similar in your life? 5.) Finally, since it's sometimes easier to post questions in writing, is there anything that you wish you could have asked me in class?
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November 25th, 2010
For those who missed the article when it came out in print in this November's issue of Outside, the article has just been posted online. The full article can be found right here. Here's a small excerpt:
Daybreak cracks like a runny egg against Montana's Spanish Peaks as the Cyborg steers his rig toward the slopes. The Cyborg is thrilled. When his truck rounds a bend obscuring Big Sky's Lone Peak, he leans toward the windshield. He wants to ski, sure, but by now you've spent enough time with the Cyborg to know there's something else in that eagerness. He is looking forward to crushing you on the mountain today. This isn't strictly because he has something to prove, though perhaps he does just a bit, the way any guy born without legs could reasonably be expected to have something to prove. What's more true is that the Cyborg is all guy, and—let's face it—the favorite pastime of twenty-something guys is gutting the confidence of the other members of the pack. Today the rest of the pack is you.
Go check it out!
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November 18th, 2010
Just saw this go up the other day and thought I should share. While I was down in Colorado speaking to students at Colorado Mountain College, I was interviewed by a local journalist, David Frey. Super nice guy, and savvy enough with his questions to get me to eek out more than I should've about the next project. Low and behold - it made it's way to The Huffington Post! I've quoted a little bit for the interview below, but for the full article click right here.
Can you talk a little about this next project? I'm basically going around the world and trying to find other people who have made really interesting adaptations outside of the kind of Western medical infrastructure a lot of us deal with. Especially from the experience I have had traveling abroad, you really get the sense that this is more prevalent in developing countries than it is in Western ones. The need is also greater, because there's less funding, there's less governmental infrastructure, there's less access to medical infrastructure. So that is going to be the next project. In many ways it's the inverse of the Rolling Exhibition: focusing on people who get stared at, maybe because of their interesting adaptations. We have locations like India, Congo, Haiti, Russia, Brazil. But this is not just an exhibit. This is a book project. I'm pitching a book, but it's also going to be delivered through a photo series. So you have portraits of the people who created these interesting adaptations interspersed between each chapter that would otherwise be a massive travelogue. I'm trying to keep the photo project moving simultaneously as well as write about it as well as chronicle other people's inventions. It's a bit daunting. So how did your new cheetah legs come about? Trying to profile people in developing countries, I realized I had to have something that could take me off the sidewalk, right? The skateboard, despite all its practicality, is limited to the ground rolling beneath it. I found that I needed something that is going to allow me to ambulate without having to deal with pavement. If people stare at you on a skateboard, they must really stare at you on cheetah legs. Yeah, if I'm in Saudi Arabia or Haiti, I think I'll get a few stares on this next project.
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